will

Reading ‘Will O The Mill’ brings me a lot of pleasure, the kind of joy that quenches my yearning of beautiful language but at the same time makes me mellow for its tone gives me enough clue of what’s in the store.

After ‘The Merry Men’, reading this story is so delightful. The words are so moving, Robert proves his mastery of depicting things so clearly stated, able to spark my imaginations. Will itself is the kind of character that makes me want to meet him personally. The sort of a very nice guy whom I would love to have a chat with.

The story is a little bit tricky. The first pages Robert mentions how the young Will wishes to leave the mill and sets up for an adventure. Up to this part, I really think he will go to the city or elsewhere.

Much to my surprise, Will doesn’t leave. He even develops his business well, gets admiration from the neighbors then invites Marjory and his father to live there while their residence is under reconstruction.

Then I think Will will marry Marjory considering his crush to her from the very beginning of their encounter. I can clearly feel that from the sentences. Instead of tying a knot, Will and Marjory separate. Will says it’s better for them to remain as friends while marriage option remains possible should Marjory wishes them to unite.

If I were Marjory I’d slap Will’s face upon hearing this. I agree with her that Will’s confessions hurt her feelings. Even so, Robert tricks me again, this time around with Marjory’s testimonials which say she is happy that they don’t get marry. Will and Marjory become good friends for nearly three years. Despite Will’s affections to her, it’s crazy to think they can live their lives as good pals.

When Marjory becomes the wife of a man, it’s a pity that Will feels sad, too. I don’t know whether he’s sad because of ‘losing’ a very dear friend or because he’s sorrowful because now Marjory belongs to someone’s heart. At this point, I can’t help wondering why Will acts that way. It’s like if he loves her, shouldn’t he marry her or something? Is it because he is uncertain or foolish enough to act for his or her own happiness?

The rest of the story after her death is what this writing is very heartbreaking. Does Will decide to spend their rest of his life alone because his love is solely for Marjory? Or what? I know I have no rights to judge someone because of something but I really, deeply feel sorry that Will ends up living alone.

His good reputation earns so many respects from a lot of people, including passers-by or guests. They encourage Will to travel but the protagonist chooses not to go. And when death invites him to travel forever, Will is joyful as for him, he has no one left to be taken care of other than Marjory. So when death comes, he is happy that since he no longer has someone to talk to, he is now free to leave.

This piece of story really moves me. On one side, I am sympathized with Will, the kind of person who wholly loves someone, like Marjory. The fact that he takes care his residence, business mesmerizes me, too. He opts staying at home despite so many stories about going out. His loyalty awes me so much.

But one the other side, I wish Will would seek friends elsewhere, fall in love with a new women and raise a happy family. It’s all a matter of choice, anyway. And that what makes this story is so wise, ordinary. Robert presents readers with life choices, and we can learn a lot of things from Will’s life.

Well, I don’t think Will is unhappy anyway. The story challenges my life perspective. Will’s choice is definitely acceptable. If you completely in love with just one person and one life why would you bother leaving it? That’s why I feel this story is so humane. You can put your shoes in Will’s and this has got me thinking about my life at the moment.

I love the kind of story which is like this one. Leaving my heart so mixed with feelings. Prompting me to contemplate about my own life. Thinking hard on what has gone wrong with my life thus far. This is the most ordinary yet wisest story I have ever read so far. Well done, Robert. Thanks for writing this one!

Thank you for this picture.

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3 thoughts on “‘Will O The Mill’, the wisest story I’ve ever read

    1. Haiii.. Thanks for dropping by at my blog. I really love yours, the design is attractive but most of all the contents are so rich. Will definitely check it out more often. Cheers!

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