The number 1 challenge in ‘Middlemarch’: plentiful characters

Middlemarch ... New edition

Just when I am curious about the life of Dorothea Brooke after she marries with Reverand Edward Casaubon, George Eliot presents me with the new major character, Dr. Tertius Lydgate through events involving Rosamund and Fred Vincy. Eliot suspends the life of Dorothea with the coming of this brilliant doctor in Middlemarch.

While Dorothea’s part runs simple, the doctor’s ways of adjusting himself in the county is broad and complicated. Eliot introduces what motivates Lydgate becoming a doctor, what shapes his medical belief and what kind of mission he carries in the small town.

Plus, Eliot mentions Lydgate’s brief obsession toward a Parisian theater actress who influences his preference about woman. The complicated one is in regard with the mention of several prominent Middlemarch figures, such as Mr. Bulstrode and Mr. Camden Farebrother, Mr. Chichely and the Vincys.

In addition, I get a glimpse on the matters involving Fred who is said to have been in a huge debt. His laziness makes Mary doesn’t count him as a potential husband. There is a tension, too, between Mr. Vincy and Mr. Bulstrode.

While Rosamund and Mary are close friends yet they both have different views. Eliot states early in this novel that Rosamund and Lydgate hit it off the moment they get the first sight of each other at the Mr. Farebrother’s house.

Within the first 135 pages of this very thick book of 668 pages, I already get so many things about the people in Middlemarch. Again, they emerge when the novel is only 135 pages young.

I slowly digest the materials every time they contain a lot of figures like in ‘Middlemarch’. I need better concentration to memorize who are they all as the novel progresses. Sometimes I forget the roles some of them play in the book then I have to recall them back. Or, I just resume the reading process while not really remembering the minor characters knowing what matters most are those concerning Dorothea and Lydgate, Eliot’s grand focus of her masterpiece.

Now I comprehend this book is quite heavy as I need to put steady focus reading it. If not I will get lost in the whole story. The tough thing about reading canon literature such as this one is that the authors bring up a lot of characters whose contributions are necessary to the lives of the major ones.

The interactions of the minor people become the avenues through which the authors inject their overall views about life, love and humanity, as I can get from how Eliot describes the dialogues involving the minor people in the book.

The novel contains stories behind stories. I need to cleave apart layers after layers while the book is very far from closure. Anyway, I enjoy reading it so much. Through conversations between Rosamund and Mary, for instance, Eliot presents me two kinds of women. Rosy is a clever, elegant yet as Mary says, she is blameless, or in my word, a naive one. Mary, on the other hand, appears strong in front of anyone, including feeling no care to Fred, the man she loves, but she is a very sensible person.

‘Middlemarch’ is very entertaining book so far. It is witty, wonderfully-written, deep.  Eliot blends idealism as one of its central themes, with comical languages once in a while. No wonder it is regarded as one of the best novels ever written of all time for I can feel a lot of things within just one package. Thank you, Eliot!

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YES! I completely enjoy reading ‘Middlemarch’ after some failed trials

This is one of the pleasantest posts I have ever shared here. Last night, I was so happy because I retook Middlemarch that has been standing in the bookshelf for as many months I can barely remember. I couldn’t believe myself that I have been immersed in the classic since then. I am so fascinated and grateful for myself because, hell, I bought the book in 2008, been tempted to read it for like, two or three times, but none of which leading me exceeding page 25, LOL!

I have survived until page 30 so far. What makes me joyful is that I have been enjoying reading it until now. This is a miracle! The recipe is forcing myself reading the words although I don’t exactly what all words mean to me (please underrstand that English language is not my mother tongue, hehe).

While the key is also applicable when I read ‘Sense and Sensibility’, how does ‘Middlemarch’ gets more exciting the more I take in words?

In ‘Sense and Sensibility’, I find it a little hard to thoroughly enjoy all of its contents somewhere in the middle of it. The first pages are easy to be understood. As the story progresses, I can’t help feeling a little bit puzzled.

On the contrary, ‘Middlemarch’ is not easy to read from the very first pages although they describe the beauty of Dorothea and Celia and how both siblings differ from each other. But once I pass through them all, everything becomes delicate to taste, hehe.. Can’t hardly wait to read more of it very soon. The novel is more than 600 pages, probably as thick as ‘Wives and Daughters’ whose fonts are much bigger than ‘Middlemarch”’s. It’s going to be a huge work for me given the very thick volume but I am sure I am going to have a very fascinating adventure as long as I enjoy reading it. And so far, it has been hell of a good one.

Very much thanks I would like to say to Joshua Becker, the founder of becomingminimalist.com, who reviews an article by Emily Esfahani Smith about what makes one’s life actually happy and meaningful. Not only her story is  very interesting to read, Emily cites a very fine example to support her view from ‘Middlemarch’.

If I already know what ‘Middlemarch’ is all about then why the hell must I read it again? You may ask me that question.

It’s because I have been long curious what makes the book is very widely-accepted as one of the best novels ever written of all time. Plus, George Eliot writes it. I love her writing style and her ideas though not all of her works end in happy notes. I still remember the joy I have reading ‘The Mill on the Floss’. Although ‘Adam Bede’ a little bit confuses me, I am enchanted by its happy ending. All in all, Eliot’s works never fail satisfying my curiosity. That what makes me idolizing hers.

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After reading ‘Sense and Sensibility’. Revisions from previous post

I am so relieved that I complete reading ‘Sense and Sensibility’ because  I am freed from reading such hard novel despite simple stories in it. I write about why the novel is a difficult reading material in previous post.

I don’t actually completely understand the whole plots because of the language but somehow I manage finish reading it. So I’m happy that I fulfill my own promise. Because of the writing technique which is much harder than in ‘Emma’, I don’t really enjoy reading ‘Sense and Sensibility’. But I do salute that the title emphasizes much on sisterhood rather than romance itself.

I, too, appreciate Jane Austen who brings up social and marital conditions at the time the book is created so that readers can clearly comprehend why money and wealth play very important roles in marriage. The case of Willoughby proves this fact.

Anyway.. I would like to correct what I post previously because I don’t yet finish reading the novel.

First of all, Elinor Dashwood is married to Edward Ferrras, which surprises me somehow. It turns out Lucy has an affair with Edward’s brother, Robert. Then, Marianne Dashwood becomes the wife of Colonel Brandon though their wedding doesn’t take immediately after Elinor and Edward’s.

It’s a tale eventually ends happily for all protagonists, and almost all figures in it. Another relief for me after going through such a complicated writing style. Thank you, Jane Austen!

‘Sense and Sensibility’ such a reading challenge for me

Reading ‘Sense and Sensibility’ is like diving into a deep ocean without having sufficient diving or snorkeling tools. Honestly, I don’t really enjoy reading the book not because it tells a boring story or easy to predict. But it’s more because I find Jane Austen’s language is too heavy for me. Too polite, too abstract. The book’s language is much higher than Emma’s.

Emma is more cheerful with a lot of dialogues here and there. But Sense and Sensibility contains lesser number of conversations. Jane Austen applies difficult writing style here. My mind finds it hard to even describe what goes on in the scenes given Austen’s well-chosen words.

Sense and Sensibility is more decent than Mary Barton, the one which I used to think the softest novel I have ever read. Sense is so sensible that it sometimes sounds too dramatic but another time it makes the pain endured by Marianne and Elinor seems so devastating.

I have never come across a woman whose heart is so completely broken by a man who doesn’t even declare his love than Marianne. And I have never found a female leading protagonist whose fate is stagnant as she gets herself busy takes care of the affairs those surrounding her than Elinor Dashwood.

Sense and Sensibility offers more than love but the novel is extraordinary because it conveys messages about family relationship, social and marital conditions at that time. Of all Victorian classics that I have read so far, no books that highlight the importance of money, so essential that you have to mention the calculation of your property, than those by Jane Austen. In this novel, such calcuulations play very important roles that even Willoughby leaves Marianne in exchange of a high social status by marrying a rich woman.

On the contrary, Edward Ferrars opts to be expelled from home and loses his inheritance as a consequence of marrying Lucy, an ordinary woman with no wealth. Jane Austen portrays this fact in such polite ways that readers are left to take their own perceptions about that. It’s funny that the book stands out not only because of the romances of Marianne and Elinor but also because of people’ behaviors in the 19th century.

All of these themes are beautifully, courteously captured in the book.

I wish I were Austen’s Elinor Dashwood

I wish I were a mysterious being like Elinor Dashwood. I hope I have a lot of masks to put on whenever I need it the most just like her. Of all fictional heroines that I have enjoyed so far, Elinor is the one who makes me envious. She is the one of the kind who knows how to handle her heart with so much care. You can call her a hypocrite for frequently hiding her emotions. Once you realize letting them out in whatever moments you are in may cost you a lot, you understand Elinor behaves the way she does.

Elinor is a very interesting character because she is so reserved. She is the sort of person everyone loves being around with. She knows how to interact with the so-knowing-it-all-people affairs like Mrs. Jennings. She can, too, befriend with the woman who steals the heart of the man Elinor admires so much, Lucy. As much as she wants to cry it all out when she knows Lucy is engaged and later is married to Edward Ferrars, Elinor keeps her promises of not telling every one about the secret engagement.

When her heart is still broken because of Lucy and Edward, Elinor manages to console her sister, Marianne, as Willoughby leaves her for another woman. Elinor puts forward her brain and logic when it comes to love that results in the despises from her mother and Marianne. It turns out that Elinor’s suspicions about Willoughby are indeed true.

The way Elinor is so patient with everything happening to her life and those around her is amazing. She isn’t trapped in materialistic view of the people surrounding her. Elinor is very strong woman, so tough that she can withshield the sadness in her heart for months. Even so, her life is so full of patience. On the surface, Elinor’s life seems flat and boring as she has to wait and see for all things to come into her life. Not many active actions she actually does to pursue her dreams, unlike Marianne to Willoughby.

Yet in her circumstances, she has no other better options. She can’t force her feelings to Edward while Colonel Brandon, as I come to the page of 279 out of 367, remains attached to Marianne. So Elinor keeps trying being cool and patient while watching things turning out as they are. And that is the damn difficult thing one can ever have to do.