‘Sense and Sensibility’ such a reading challenge for me

Reading ‘Sense and Sensibility’ is like diving into a deep ocean without having sufficient diving or snorkeling tools. Honestly, I don’t really enjoy reading the book not because it tells a boring story or easy to predict. But it’s more because I find Jane Austen’s language is too heavy for me. Too polite, too abstract. The book’s language is much higher than Emma’s.

Emma is more cheerful with a lot of dialogues here and there. But Sense and Sensibility contains lesser number of conversations. Jane Austen applies difficult writing style here. My mind finds it hard to even describe what goes on in the scenes given Austen’s well-chosen words.

Sense and Sensibility is more decent than Mary Barton, the one which I used to think the softest novel I have ever read. Sense is so sensible that it sometimes sounds too dramatic but another time it makes the pain endured by Marianne and Elinor seems so devastating.

I have never come across a woman whose heart is so completely broken by a man who doesn’t even declare his love than Marianne. And I have never found a female leading protagonist whose fate is stagnant as she gets herself busy takes care of the affairs those surrounding her than Elinor Dashwood.

Sense and Sensibility offers more than love but the novel is extraordinary because it conveys messages about family relationship, social and marital conditions at that time. Of all Victorian classics that I have read so far, no books that highlight the importance of money, so essential that you have to mention the calculation of your property, than those by Jane Austen. In this novel, such calcuulations play very important roles that even Willoughby leaves Marianne in exchange of a high social status by marrying a rich woman.

On the contrary, Edward Ferrars opts to be expelled from home and loses his inheritance as a consequence of marrying Lucy, an ordinary woman with no wealth. Jane Austen portrays this fact in such polite ways that readers are left to take their own perceptions about that. It’s funny that the book stands out not only because of the romances of Marianne and Elinor but also because of people’ behaviors in the 19th century.

All of these themes are beautifully, courteously captured in the book.

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