The number 1 challenge in ‘Middlemarch’: plentiful characters

Middlemarch ... New edition

Just when I am curious about the life of Dorothea Brooke after she marries with Reverand Edward Casaubon, George Eliot presents me with the new major character, Dr. Tertius Lydgate through events involving Rosamund and Fred Vincy. Eliot suspends the life of Dorothea with the coming of this brilliant doctor in Middlemarch.

While Dorothea’s part runs simple, the doctor’s ways of adjusting himself in the county is broad and complicated. Eliot introduces what motivates Lydgate becoming a doctor, what shapes his medical belief and what kind of mission he carries in the small town.

Plus, Eliot mentions Lydgate’s brief obsession toward a Parisian theater actress who influences his preference about woman. The complicated one is in regard with the mention of several prominent Middlemarch figures, such as Mr. Bulstrode and Mr. Camden Farebrother, Mr. Chichely and the Vincys.

In addition, I get a glimpse on the matters involving Fred who is said to have been in a huge debt. His laziness makes Mary doesn’t count him as a potential husband. There is a tension, too, between Mr. Vincy and Mr. Bulstrode.

While Rosamund and Mary are close friends yet they both have different views. Eliot states early in this novel that Rosamund and Lydgate hit it off the moment they get the first sight of each other at the Mr. Farebrother’s house.

Within the first 135 pages of this very thick book of 668 pages, I already get so many things about the people in Middlemarch. Again, they emerge when the novel is only 135 pages young.

I slowly digest the materials every time they contain a lot of figures like in ‘Middlemarch’. I need better concentration to memorize who are they all as the novel progresses. Sometimes I forget the roles some of them play in the book then I have to recall them back. Or, I just resume the reading process while not really remembering the minor characters knowing what matters most are those concerning Dorothea and Lydgate, Eliot’s grand focus of her masterpiece.

Now I comprehend this book is quite heavy as I need to put steady focus reading it. If not I will get lost in the whole story. The tough thing about reading canon literature such as this one is that the authors bring up a lot of characters whose contributions are necessary to the lives of the major ones.

The interactions of the minor people become the avenues through which the authors inject their overall views about life, love and humanity, as I can get from how Eliot describes the dialogues involving the minor people in the book.

The novel contains stories behind stories. I need to cleave apart layers after layers while the book is very far from closure. Anyway, I enjoy reading it so much. Through conversations between Rosamund and Mary, for instance, Eliot presents me two kinds of women. Rosy is a clever, elegant yet as Mary says, she is blameless, or in my word, a naive one. Mary, on the other hand, appears strong in front of anyone, including feeling no care to Fred, the man she loves, but she is a very sensible person.

‘Middlemarch’ is very entertaining book so far. It is witty, wonderfully-written, deep.  Eliot blends idealism as one of its central themes, with comical languages once in a while. No wonder it is regarded as one of the best novels ever written of all time for I can feel a lot of things within just one package. Thank you, Eliot!

The picture is taken from this 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s