‘The Moonstone’ Madness: Homecoming as way to solve problems

I love the ways the story begins and ends in the same place. The Moonstone is firstly seen in a shrine surrounded by Hindoos and as the novel ends, it comes back to where it belongs.
Interestingly, Mr. Franklin Blake returns to his aunt’s residence to investigate on the missing gem on his own given his intention to clear up all the mess between him and Rachel Verrinder. To the Yorkshire the indebted man goes back, almost one year after the incident occurs. One year being in the East doesn’t help him taking the mystery out of his head.
With the help of Ezra Jennings, he is able to restore his good name, especially in front of Rachel. He is capable of explaining what exactly happens after Rachel’s birthday dinner. I’m sorry to put a lot of spoilers here for writing this part is inevitable. It is true that Mr. Franklin Blake is the one who steals the diamond with the knowing of Rachel.

That explains her attitude to the man whom she really loves is 180 degrees in contrary to what she used to do to him.
But Mr. Franklin Blake does that unconsciously. He falls under the influence of laudanum, a mixture of opium and alcohol, put by Mr. Candy, a doctor who is upset with Mr. Franklin Blake’s harsh words toward his profession as a doctor. So the mess starts from Mr. Franklin Blake’s jokes to Mr. Candy that later turns to his laudanum consumption. Since he is overwhelmed with the Moonstone, Mr. Franklin Blake goes to the Rachel’s room then takes it in order to put it in a safe place.
Readers will find this out as the novel progresses toward its finale. One by one all riddles are put to the surface but first of all readers must dwell so long upon clues, opinions, ideas that come up throughout the book. Thanks to Wilkie Collins’ sophisticated writing technique, the story moves fast that barely leaves readers get bored.
In an attempt to reveal all riddles, such as the smear of the nightgown hidden by Rosanna Spearman, Mr. Franklin Blake has to come back to where the late hides the box carrying the gown. Also, Mr. Franklin Blake has to meet Rachel and Sergeant Cuff to gather their statements. Plus, the gentleman has to invite Mr. Candy who falls so ill because of the fever and fatigue he suffers after the birthday event.
It is quite surprising that Ezra Jennings, much like Rosanna Spearman, emerges when the book starts getting complicated. The figure that I think will play a minor role turns out to the savior for Mr. Franklin Blake and Rachel. This is because Ezra Jennings initiates to put laudanum into the body of Mr. Franklin Blake, orders things as the way they were one year ago, invites Mr. Bruff as a witness then starts the experiment.
From his crazy idea it turns out that Mr. Franklin Blake does what he exactly does when the gemstone goes missing. While the characters are busy solving the riddles, the Moonstone for about one year is on the bank in London under the hands of Mr. Septimus Luker. During that time three Hindoos hunt it down. They are finally able to get it back then they give it to the caretaker of the gemstone in the shrine of a sacred city called Kattiawar in India.
I am myself so drown with the idea of starting things from the very beginning to solve problems in Mr. Franklin Blake’s life and the people concerning the Moonstone. Taking this story into my personal opinions, the idea of tracing things from the very roots are very challenging yet so worthy of trying to do in one’s life. Doing this requires bravery as Mr. Franklin Blake does. Sometimes, doing this will be fruitful or will not be.
While getting back to where the problems come may face us with painful memories, failures and nostalgia, our hearts are purified along the processes. All scars, heartbreaks will somehow be cleaned up while we battle to find solutions or answers. Much like walking on two sides of completely different views; one is full of tears or mess, the other one starts providing us with crystal clear outcomes. This is one of the wars one so worthy of trying.
And Mr. Franklin Blake succeeds in doing that. Not only the mess concerning the Moonstone is over, he and Rachel eventually gets married. I love Collins’ idea of bringing things back to start something new and fresh, as what happens to Mr. Franklin Blake. We can associate his experiences with our lives in whatever problems or trauma we encounter.

 

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