Off the Unread-List: The Professor by Charlotte Bronte

I am very glad that I finished reading The Professor last week. It is uneasy for me resuming reading the book after I abandoned it some weeks because, frankly speaking, I couldn’t bear of reading many sentences in the French language here and there.

To be exact, I find it very disturbing that I had to look at the Note section to find out what those words meant. So I skipped, I barely read the words. In consequence, I didn’t enjoy reading the book. Once the amount of French words began decreasing, I gained my enthusiasm reading the novel.

By still feeling inconvenient because of the French language, I managed to have digested the rest of the book. Compared to Jane Eyre, The Professor actually conveys much diverse topics. What I mostly love from the book is how Charlotte Bronte brings up education topic.

What looks like an accident for William Chrimsworth to be a professor turns out to be the major line that connects him with his future wife, Frances Henri. I find it very beautiful that their matrimony later brings them opening school, teaching pupils. William who is once underestimated by his own brother and Frances who gets her eyes tired of being a lace-mender, now become well-respected people thanks to their ideas of applying good education curriculum.

Charlotte Bronte’s way of bringing up stories about patience, endurance and faith, as I find in Jane Eyre, is seamlessly told here. I always admire Charlotte Bronte’s focus on the process of achieving dreams despite thorns that may sting the characters’ journeys.

Another thing that I like most of the story is the romance itself between William and Frances. Again, Charlotte Bronte emphasizes on simplicity, even in love, an emotion that for some people, may boost their feelings, put them in a rollercoaster-kind of mode.

Unattached by relatives (for William’s only friend is Hunsden while France’s only aunt passes away), the two souls eventually find company in each other’s arms, a home where which the sweetness of their love tale is materialized in actions, supports and motivations for attaining their dream; building a school.

Their romance is filled of by hardworking and persistence but there lies its kind of beauty in it.

The Professor offers me a unique view about friendship. Here, William’s fate is helped by some unlikely people in his life, in particular Hunsden, who dislikes his brother, Edward, yet sympathizes with William since his doomed days in Chrimsworth Hall.

Despite his satirical, witty traits that draw uneasiness upon Frances, Hunsden is always there for William. He offers helps, gives good advice which it’s true when he frequently asks for a ‘thank you’ in exchange for what he does, but I don’t think William pays him back in proper ways. So, probably, that is why Charlotte Bronte ends her story with Hunsden being in the last pages of the book featuring Victor, William’s son.

William doesn’t verbally thank his good buddy but the fact that they spend their old years living closely to one another is more than enough to emphasize how much Hunsden means to William’s life. Much like his deep love for Frances that isn’t translated into flowery words, so is his thankfulness for Hunsden. And I think that what makes The Professor a worthy of reading for gaining values on life, love and friendship the way they should be.

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