Wilkie Collins’s Count Fosco Reminds Me So Much of Sengkuni

Sangkuni illustration. Picture source: abasrin.com

Wilkie Collins’s Count Fosco and Vyasa’s Sengkuni or Sangkuni have many hateful yet agile traits one can relate and learn. Written in centuries apart, “Mahābhārata” and “The Woman in White” captivate me with the inserting of Sengkuni and Count Fosco. I detest each of them but I can’t deny I learn so much from their cunning.

I haven’t read “Mahābhārata” honestly. I only watched the Indian epic masterpiece when was I a little kid. Regularly watching the show was more than sufficient to have put Sengkuni as an unforgettable antagonist in my whole life. I heard him as reference when my father and his brother were referring to national prominent politician from New Order (I didn’t mention his name here, by the way). After I watched the series, I couldn’t agree more.

Sengkuni was best remembered because of his sly tactics for making his 100 nephews known as Korawa defeating their five cousins called Pandawa. Sengkuni was manipulative, provocative person who ignited hatred in the hearts of the Korawa people, especially Duryodana. His resentment toward Pandawa stemmed from his objection when his father accepted a marriage proposal for his sister, Gandari, from Dretarastra, a blind, kind-hearted prince from Hastinapura kingdom. Sengkuni, who was actually a prince from Gandhara empire, wished his sister would have married with Dretarastra’s brother, Pandu. Pandu was the father of Pandawa whereas Dretarastra was the father of Korawa. Despite the two’s good relationship, their sons were fighting for possessing Kuru empire with Sengkuni as the mastermind. Their story is known as Mahabharata.

Count Fosco or Isidor Ottavio Baldassare Fosco was not a layman. Count (male)/ Countess (female) or Conte in Italian language refers to a title in European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey an approximate rank intermediate between the highest and lowest titles of nobility, according to Pine, L.G. Titles: How the King Became His Majesty. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1992. P. 73. OCLC 27827106.

Personally, Count Fosco is like some types of people that I know in my life. They have certain attitudes that make them looking like noble people on the surface. The way they talk, how they treat others are different from common people. They know how to keep their tongues in check even when they are in debts or other huge problems. I call them as those who are enslaved to creating good images.

Such is what I learn from Count Fosco. He was in dire need of money but he was not looking as desperate person. He maintained his good humor sense, greeted strangers, and treated people nicely. He didn’t let others know what trouble he was in because that would taint his noble status. This what made Marian Halcombe firstly liked him. After she knew him a little bit longer, she found out who this man truly was. Her realization that Count Fosco was reading her mind and studying her behavior frightened her. This what made the protagonist was very careful in dealing with him. Unlike Laura Fairlie who was frontally disliking him, Mariam was more patient because she knew she must be resourceful and intelligent to get over him.

In addition to his observing nature, Count Fosco was good-tempered person, especially for those who were against his wishes, such as Mariam Halcombe and Laura Fairlie. He knew how to differently handle the two given their traits. Count Fosco was also persistent when it came to reaching his goals. Here, he carefully executed his plans of taking over 21,000 pounds belonging to Laura Fairlie through very well-planned timeline. He knew very well that good strategy wasn’t enough. There required patience to let things rolling on as he planned them, the trait that wasn’t possessed by Sir Percival Glyde.

Count Fosco and Sengkuni were top “brain washers”. While Count Sengkuni consistently whispered devilish words to the Korawa people, Count Fosco did the same thing for his wife, Madame Fosco, who was actually Laura’s aunt. She was so obedient to her husband that she worshipped him like a god. Count Fosco “guided” Sir Percival Glyde, his close friend, in their goals of getting the money.

Walter Hartright could have toppled him with just one strong blow. And I wished he did that because I really, completely detested Count Fosco. Of course, Wilkie Collins didn’t opt for that. Further legal consequence might emerge for Walter Hartright. Marian Halcombe’s descriptions became Walter Hartright’s weapons when confronting him in his rented room before he went away to Paris.

Much like Marian Halcombe, Walter Hartright was patient and clever. On top of that, his sincerity guided this man to smoothly deal with Count Fosco. Walter Hartright fully understood he had to be very well-spoken to confront a manipulative person like Count Fosco.

As Walter Hartright didn’t have legal supports for proving Count Fosco’s wrongdoings, Wilkie Collins remarkably ended the life of Count Fosco. He was killed by unknown people from his past, politically related, in a strange land (Paris) then surrounded by Parisians in a public place. Count Fosco’s life was eventually very much disgraced.

 

 

 

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Delving thick layer of secrets within “The Woman in White”

Wilkie Collins executes heap of secrets very well to deliver his messages on gender equality, marital issue and moral decay in “The Woman in White”. With the secrets, he successfully drove me to complete the 619 pages long within eight days despite fairly difficult language, political background in Italy and legal affairs at the Victorian Era in the 19th century.

Mind you, I didn’t Google what was happening in the Pizza Country back then. I also didn’t stop reading “The Woman in White” for further seeking information on inheritance division amongst heirs in elite class in the UK in the century. Doing so would probably cast me away from thoroughly enjoying the book. What a justification to say that I was too lazy for doing those things, LOL!

Anne Catherick alias the woman in white triggered the whole grand secret in the book which was Sir Percival Glyde as an illegal son of his parents, Sir Felix Glyde and Cecilia Jane Ester because the two had never been married. All the wealth that Sir Percival Glyde possessed was taken out from one of his distant relatives who never returned to the UK. He took over his relative’s resources by issuing his birth certificate (which was an easy task) and forging the marriage date of his parents. The second method required him to approach and shower Anne Catherick’s mother with gold and jewelries.

Sir Percival Glyde was secretly contacting Mrs. Catherick for his interest because her husband was a clergyman. Lured by the gifts, Mrs. Catherick took a key to a vestry where which her husband worked, at Old Welmingham. There, he did the crime then put Mrs. Catherick to blame by the locals because they believed she was unfaithful wife for having an affair with Sir Percival Glyde.

To this consequence, Sir Percival Glyde ordered Mrs. Catherick to keep the secret. In exchange, he was giving her money, putting her under observation so that she wouldn’t tell the secret. Old Welmingham was chosen to “imprison her” because as Walter Hartright later said, the district was showing what moral decay of human beings looked like. The residents didn’t care with what wrong deeds Mrs. Catherick did in the past as long as she donated her money. So, it wasn’t without any reasons that she was staying in the district because she believed her neighbors would only care on her money.

All through years, the secret was safe until Anne Catherick heard one of their conversations. Anne, who was born with mental illness, threatened that she would tell the truth. This later caused Sir Percival Glyde to have placed her in a private asylum.

One midnight, she managed to have escaped from the asylum then met with Walter Hartright on his way back to his rented room in London. Coincidentally, Walter Hartright would teach Marian Halcombe and Laura Fairlie the day after that hence the weird meeting was driving his curiosity by the time he encountered with Marian Halcombe.

His questions about this woman in white got bigger when Marian told him one of his mother’s letter mentioning Anne. The late Mrs. Fairlie said she was fond of Anne despite her mental illness. Then, she gave her white cloths that Anne was wearing throughout her life, gaining her as “the woman in white”. Reading Mrs. Fairlie’s statements that Anne was resembling Laura Fairlie got me suspicious on her true identity. Later, it was true that Anne was actually Laura Fairlie’s half-sister! She was the illegal daughter of Mr. Phillips Fairlie and Mrs. Catherick back then. Another issue on illegitimate children!

Walter Hartright and Marian Halcombe are two “scissors” to peel the layers out. While Marian Halcombe was sacrificing her life for Laure Fairlie, Walter Hartright was risking his life for truth. I am personally captivated by the two thanks to the author’s ideas of making them super brave, resourceful and patient.

I myself salute Marian’s love for Laura that although they were not connected by blood, Marian was doing her utmost to have saved Laura’s life from her wicked husband, Sir Percival Glyde. Some memorable scenes were when she banged the door of Mr. Frederick Fairlie’s room after she told him that Laura agreed to marry Sir Percival Glyde because she was afraid of tainting her family’s good image. Mr. Frederick Fairlie was Laura’s uncle who was insensitive, arrogant and annoying. He was underestimating women’ rights when he didn’t wish to deliberate Laura’s inheritance division with the family lawyer, Mr. Gilmore. This issue later created future problem between Laura or Lady Glyde with her husband. Of course, the most notable scene I would always remember was when heavy rainfall was pouring down her body as she was listening to all secrets between Sir Percival Glyde and Count Fosco. She was carefully placing herself in the spot where which she was able to find out what motivated them torturing her half-sister. As a result, she was sick so bad.

Sir Percival Glyde and Count Fosco was badly needing money, one of the reasons was because Sir Percival Glyde was in huge debt. He then required Lady Glyde’s signature to get access to 21,000 pounds she was possessing then divide it with his best friend. But Lady Glyde didn’t wish to do this unless her husband tells him the purpose of the request. This stirred his anger, opened his real motive of marrying her that was because of her wealth.

The two arranged strategies to obtain the money, which they did eventually. They lied to Anne Catherick, to Lady Glyde while Marian was in her sickness. Anne’s heart disease cost her death, which was falsified into Laura Fairlie’s given their physical resemblance. As Anne was buried, Laura was instead put in the asylum. When things looking bright, their unanticipated enemy returned from Honduras, Walter Hartright.

Walter Hartright was coming back to the UK braver than ever. It was his courage that brought him to have chased after the woman in white. It was also his bravery that led him to unravel cruelties did by Sir Percival Glyde and Count Fosco. I really admire Wilkie Collins’s showing readers, well me at least, how sincere motive and bravery can encourage us to do so many good deeds later on. Add to that is intelligence. Then our contribution can go wildly.

Walter Hartright utilized his sincerity, intelligence and politeness to meet, inquire and even ask for helps from people whom he only knew by hearsay. It wasn’t an easy thing to do when he needed to meet Mrs. Clements for knowing who was Mrs. Catherick. It was even more difficult when he must speak to Mrs. Catherick herself. With spies hired by Sir Percival Glyde and Count Fosco following him, Walter Hartright was a heroic character I will never forget.

I almost sunk into disappointment when Wilkie Collins opted to end the life of Sir Percival Glyde through fire. I wished Walter Hartright would kill him or drag him into a prison. I also expected the same thing for Count Fosco. But then I told to myself the expectations would create another problem. Walter Hartright might be put into a prison if he killed one of them or both of all. In addition, Walter Hartright didn’t have sufficient to bring him before a court. What he sufficiently had was evidence to clear up Laura’s reputation as a living human being.

It was later understandable that Wilkie Collins instead selected the two villains were dead because of their own deeds. A fire burned the vestry where which Sir Percival Glyde was trying to destroy the falsified marriage certificate and Count Fosco was killed by unknown party from his past. The ending reveals the same message: cruel people will get their deeds repaid in much more improper ways.

 

 

 

 

 

“Great Expectations” Review: How Pip’s Life Speaks A Lot About Mine, and May Be Yours

Pip’s poverty doesn’t necessarily cause him leaving his life and Joe. His wish of becoming a gentleman gets into his mind after Estella, the only woman whom he loves, mocks him. Pip wants to prove Estella that he is worthy of her love. So off he goes to London under mysterious inheritance from someone he doesn’t know about.

Thankfully, I am not as poor as Pip. My intention of leaving for Jakarta is on the back of my mind since I am at university level. I have no ideas what Jakarta looks like but like millions Indonesian living in villages, the capital is the city of promise, much like London is for Pip. I leave for Jakarta with huge dream and army of academic credential but few experiences.

Pip expects the money he inherits will make him a gentleman who deserves a place in elite class in London. And I live in Jakarta to earn good amount of money and establish my career as a reputable, if possible, an international caliber journalist. We both have dreams. We both expect something and someone.

It’s our expectations that drag us along the days, the weeks and eventually the years. Years pass us by and all that we face are conflicts, problems that get us to think: “Are we wrongly expect on that something or someone?” Or “Are we wrong to expect at the beginning?”

Reading Great Expectations then again lead me to come to a question that I and my close friends sometimes discuss about: “Can we expect our life be this and that? Or “Should we live the life like a flowing river?”

Great Expectations touches the basic question that I believe cross our mind one moment or the other time. As you live your life, do you live it with self-determination to chase after something or someone, or do you take and do whatever life has in store for you?

Interestingly, in Pip’s story, Charles Dickens turns the thing around about failed expectations to self-improvement that gets more attention as I read it until the last page. Personally, I think Pip’s expectations crumble down. He doesn’t only get Estella’s love but is also in huge debt. For worse (or better), the actual benefactor is beyond his expectation. I, too, has to resign sooner than expected because of conflicts in previous office. And now I have to set up a freelancing career on my own.

What is remarkably about Pip’s turning point in life is that he seems no longer putting as much weight on his number 1 expectation as before. His life as a Londoner meets him with various characters, some are good, some are bad. He learns that those with nice clothes and first-class reputation don’t automatically tell they are good people.

And as with Estella, Pip bitterly learns his pure love for her is taken for granted. As much as he believes Estella actually likes him in return, Pip realizes not everyone can be honest with his or her feeling. Not every one wishes to take a risk of fighting for what she or he loves. Much is in the case of Estella who gets married with someone whom she doesn’t love because she gets used to playing with boys’ hearts (as taught by Miss Havisham). It isn’t that surprising at the end of the novel, it is Estella’s husband that plays her heart and makes her a victim of his physical abuse.

As his expectations start fading away, Pip’s focus shifts to something more urgent which regards to the life of the benefactor. Here, Dickens implicitly says sometimes you need to be thankful for abundant problems in your life because they get you moving on with your life.

Fortunately (or not fortunately), Pip puts more and more energy to save the life of the benefactor who loves him so much that he is willing to give all his money for Pip despite the fact they meet for like, twice or three times, when Pip is still a small, sentimental boy.

The love from the benefactor then teaches Pip on unexpected thing that he gets so misunderstood for the whole time as he believes it is Miss Havisham who inherits the money. From this, Pip is awakened from his poor treatment to Joe who dearly loves him but gets Pip’s underestimation in return because Joe is poor and illiterate.

Pip’s expectations go from great to small yet meaningful one when all he cares is paying off what he can to the benefactor. At first, he wishes to get rid to him but as he shows his tenderness, Pip’s love grows bigger. He really treats him like his father and nurture him until the day he passes away.

And after that, Pip’s life gets straightened when he works so hard to pay all of his debt to Joe. Pip loses his initial great expectations but he isn’t that broken.

Off the Unread-List: The Professor by Charlotte Bronte

I am very glad that I finished reading The Professor last week. It is uneasy for me resuming reading the book after I abandoned it some weeks because, frankly speaking, I couldn’t bear of reading many sentences in the French language here and there.

To be exact, I find it very disturbing that I had to look at the Note section to find out what those words meant. So I skipped, I barely read the words. In consequence, I didn’t enjoy reading the book. Once the amount of French words began decreasing, I gained my enthusiasm reading the novel.

By still feeling inconvenient because of the French language, I managed to have digested the rest of the book. Compared to Jane Eyre, The Professor actually conveys much diverse topics. What I mostly love from the book is how Charlotte Bronte brings up education topic.

What looks like an accident for William Chrimsworth to be a professor turns out to be the major line that connects him with his future wife, Frances Henri. I find it very beautiful that their matrimony later brings them opening school, teaching pupils. William who is once underestimated by his own brother and Frances who gets her eyes tired of being a lace-mender, now become well-respected people thanks to their ideas of applying good education curriculum.

Charlotte Bronte’s way of bringing up stories about patience, endurance and faith, as I find in Jane Eyre, is seamlessly told here. I always admire Charlotte Bronte’s focus on the process of achieving dreams despite thorns that may sting the characters’ journeys.

Another thing that I like most of the story is the romance itself between William and Frances. Again, Charlotte Bronte emphasizes on simplicity, even in love, an emotion that for some people, may boost their feelings, put them in a rollercoaster-kind of mode.

Unattached by relatives (for William’s only friend is Hunsden while France’s only aunt passes away), the two souls eventually find company in each other’s arms, a home where which the sweetness of their love tale is materialized in actions, supports and motivations for attaining their dream; building a school.

Their romance is filled of by hardworking and persistence but there lies its kind of beauty in it.

The Professor offers me a unique view about friendship. Here, William’s fate is helped by some unlikely people in his life, in particular Hunsden, who dislikes his brother, Edward, yet sympathizes with William since his doomed days in Chrimsworth Hall.

Despite his satirical, witty traits that draw uneasiness upon Frances, Hunsden is always there for William. He offers helps, gives good advice which it’s true when he frequently asks for a ‘thank you’ in exchange for what he does, but I don’t think William pays him back in proper ways. So, probably, that is why Charlotte Bronte ends her story with Hunsden being in the last pages of the book featuring Victor, William’s son.

William doesn’t verbally thank his good buddy but the fact that they spend their old years living closely to one another is more than enough to emphasize how much Hunsden means to William’s life. Much like his deep love for Frances that isn’t translated into flowery words, so is his thankfulness for Hunsden. And I think that what makes The Professor a worthy of reading for gaining values on life, love and friendship the way they should be.

Fly me to the UK for a literary adventure I’ve always dreamt of

Quoting famous speech from Martin Luther King Jr, ‘I Have a Dream’, well, I have a dream, too, which is to launch what I call as a literary adventure to say hello, take inspiration for writing then say thank you for these literary genius whose works not only entertain my soul but their imaginations and voices have helped me finding my own place in this hectic cum wonderful modern life.
Thomas Hardy
I have been longing for paying a visit to the places that play significant roles in the works of Thomas Hardy, one of my most-beloved authors. If you have bumped to this messy blog then you realize how much I admire his works as his name becomes the most-tagged word in this place, hehe..
If you ask me why do I love Hardy so much, one of my answers is because he knows how to appreciate nature then put them into beautiful words. Reading his novels soothe my heart because his words are indeed pieces of arts, beautifully-crafted.
I would really love to go to the house he was born in a house in Stinsford, a village and civil parish in southwest Dorset, one mile east of Dorchester. Stinsford is the original ‘Mellstock’ in his ‘Under the Greenwood Tree’ and ‘Jude the Obscure’. I haven’t read ‘Under the Greenwood Tree’ but I have enjoyed ‘Jude’.
The first site I wish I can visit is Hardy’s cottage as you can see from the below picture. This is where the poet was born in 1840 then writing ‘Far from the Madding Crowd’ in 1872 and ‘Under the Greenwood Tree’ in 1874. I can fancy how peaceful it was when he was working by looking at the cottage and its surroundings. No wonder he was able to produce very fascinating words as its neighborhood was providing him a lot of inspirations to write. Hardy was staying in the cottage until he was 34 years old.

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He once moved to London but never felt at home in the big city. As such, he built a house namely Max Gate, which is just a few miles from the cottage where he was living before. He and his first and second wife inhabited the house, which I think is quite large and exquisite, from 1885 until his death in 1928. This is the house where he was creating his best fictions; ‘Tess of the d’Urbervilles’, ‘Jude the Obscure’ and ‘The Mayor of Casterbridge’ as well as most of his poems. While general fans mostly applaud ‘Tess’, ‘Far’ or ‘Jude’, my most favorite fiction is yes, ‘The Mayor of Casterbridge’. I really really admire the book. Anyway, this is Max Gate.

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George Eliot
Mary Anne Evans or mostly popular as George Eliot (12 November 1819 to 22 December 1880) is my second most-adored Victorian novelist. Until now, I don’t know how Eliot produces such an extensive, rich in terms of issues, imaginations and characterizations as in Middlemarch. By the way, my personal favorite is ‘The Mill on the Floss’ as it becomes my first ‘real’ experience reading her works. I read ‘Silas Marner’ back when I was a university student but I don’t consider it as a ‘concrete’ experience because the book that I was savoring was its simplified version. I don’t want to read the unabridged version of ‘Silas Marner’ though because the story is really sad.
So this is Arbury Hall estate. In its South Farm, the very smart baby girl namely Mary Anne Evans was born in 12 November 1819. The estate was belonging to the Newdigate family where which her father was working as a land manager there.

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In early 1820, the author family moved to Griff House where Mary Anne was living for 20 years. After that, she was travelling and moving to some places. Here is the Griff House:

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Elizabeth Gaskell
For any Victorian enthusiasts, you should try Gaskell’s books, which move very soft and smooth. ‘Mary Barton’ is my favorite book from her. No wonder she is able to produce elegantly-made words. Gaskell is described as a lady-like person, tidy, well-mannered one. Oh, I can totally associate with her writings, in terms of word choice and placement, characters (esp in ‘Wives and Daughters’) and issue selections. If I have a chance, it will be delightful to stop by in this house, where the author and her family were living for some years. Let me put the address here: 84 Plymouth Grove, Manchester. Oh I love the building. What a lovely sight!images (3).jpeg

The Bronte sisters
Of course, the Bronte Parsonage Museum must be in the list! This is the house where the Bronte family was staying which is in Haworth, West Yorkshire. Looking at the building, I think the family is quite wealthy. My favorite Bronte is Anne because her traits much like mine, hehe. Who is your beloved Bronte, my friend?

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Charles Dickens
So far, I have read ‘The Old Curiosity Shop’. I honestly say I’m not really into his works which is a matter of writing style reason. But if I were in UK, this Charles Dickens museum as you can see below is a temptation I can’t resist, hehe.. The address is on 48 Doughty street, Holborn, London. It became the home for the author from 25 March 1837 until December 1839. Though it was relatively short, the house saw him producing best fictions, ‘The Pickwick Paper’ in 1836, ‘Oliver Twist’ in 1838, ‘Nicholas Nickleby’ between 1838 and 1839 and Barnaby Rudge in 1840 and 1841. How prolific Dickens was!

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Jane Austen
And here is the queen of all romantic women out there, I included, is the one and only Jane Austen. The picture shows Jane Austen house museum in the village of Chawton, near Alton in Hampshire. She and her family were occupying the house for the last eight years of her life. It is assumed she was revising the drafts of ‘Sense and Sensibility’, ‘Pride and Prejudice’ and ‘Northanger Abbey’ here. Austen also wrote ‘Mansfield Park’, ‘Emma’ (I love Emma!) and ‘Persuasion’ here.
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Wilkie Collins
And the last author who recently spurs my adrenaline is Wilkie Collins. He is chubby anyway by looking at his picture. Collins and his wife, Caroline Graves, were occupying Harley Street 12, Marylebone, in the central of London, from 1860 to 1864. I’m not really sure whether he owned the entire building or just rented some rooms of it. Collins is said to have written most parts of one of his best mysterious novels, ‘The Woman in White’, here. I currently look for reading the title after I am so immersed with ‘The Moonstone’. images (5)
So, those are a number of sites that completely attract my desires to go there. I think my bucket-list is already full even before I have enough money to make it, hehe.. Well, never mind. Hopefully the bucket will be filled. Till then, let’s dream again!
Thank you very much for Wikipedia, Wikimedia and Wilkie-Collins.info for providing all the lovely shots.

‘The Moonstone’ Madness: the Disturbing Miss Clack

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A sense of horror struck me when I was reading the last sentences of the narration of Miss Drusilla Clack. The character that I firstly think as honest, modest and innocent starts becoming so aggressive when she was trying to persuade Rachel Verrinder staying with her after the teen’s mother passed away.
The scene was Rachel decided to go with her lawyer, Mr. Bruff, after she cancelled a planned wedding with Mr. Godfrey Abblewhite. Prior to the moment when she was about to leave with the lawyer, the father of Mr. Godfrey Abblewhite confronted her. He was absolutely disappointed with Rachel’s decision then recalled memories concerning him and Rachel’s aunt.
As the confrontation was becoming weary, Miss Clack was trying to calm the situation down by citing religious verses from the Bible. Instead of cooling this down, Mr. Abblewhite got angrier. I had felt something strange about Miss Clack and my assumption was affirmed when she was attempting to force Rachel staying with her. Miss Clack wished she could make Rachel ‘a Christian’. But her way of making Rachel closer to God was a little bit forceful and improper.
Her narration ended when Miss Clack was saying she forgave Rachel for insulting her while as a matter of fact it was actually Rachel who was afraid of Miss Clack’s method of approaching her.
Days before that, Miss Clack had actually been acting a bit too much in relation to Lady Verrinder. When the Lady was severely ill, Miss Clack, again, wished she could ‘escort’ her relative resting in peace. As such, she was attempting to put some amounts of religious books to her. I think her effort aimed at making Lady Verrinder closer to God and be purified from her sins.
Miss Clack put books in several spots in the Lady’s house in hope that she would find then read them but until the day she was dead the books remained unread. They were returned to Miss Clack instead.
Throughout The Moonstone, this particular person completely confuses me. First, it is quite strange that Wilkie Collins selects her as one of the narratives in the book since she wasn’t present in the birthday dinner of the Rachel Verrinder which later saw the Moonstone went missing.
Miss Clack is, by the way, the niece of Sir John Verrinder, Rachel’s father. Her narration becomes sort of ‘entrapment’ for me after I resume reading the book. I can feel her strong admiration to Mr. Godfrey Abblewhite. She was spying his conversation with Rachel Verrinder on the day he proposed her. Following Miss Clack’s narration of the tale makes me despise Rachel even more (since she is a stubborn girl since the beginning of the book) and put sympathy to Mr. Godfrey Abblewhite. I think the reason why Collins places Miss Clack is to ‘deceive’ readers, at least that happens to me, LOL. You know that I get my guess completely wrong for Mr. Godfrey Abblewhite is the villain of them all because of his huge debts.
Thank God Miss Clack emerges briefly in the book if not, I can’t imagine how ambiguous the novel would be.

‘The Moonstone’ Madness: Homecoming as way to solve problems

I love the ways the story begins and ends in the same place. The Moonstone is firstly seen in a shrine surrounded by Hindoos and as the novel ends, it comes back to where it belongs.
Interestingly, Mr. Franklin Blake returns to his aunt’s residence to investigate on the missing gem on his own given his intention to clear up all the mess between him and Rachel Verrinder. To the Yorkshire the indebted man goes back, almost one year after the incident occurs. One year being in the East doesn’t help him taking the mystery out of his head.
With the help of Ezra Jennings, he is able to restore his good name, especially in front of Rachel. He is capable of explaining what exactly happens after Rachel’s birthday dinner. I’m sorry to put a lot of spoilers here for writing this part is inevitable. It is true that Mr. Franklin Blake is the one who steals the diamond with the knowing of Rachel.

That explains her attitude to the man whom she really loves is 180 degrees in contrary to what she used to do to him.
But Mr. Franklin Blake does that unconsciously. He falls under the influence of laudanum, a mixture of opium and alcohol, put by Mr. Candy, a doctor who is upset with Mr. Franklin Blake’s harsh words toward his profession as a doctor. So the mess starts from Mr. Franklin Blake’s jokes to Mr. Candy that later turns to his laudanum consumption. Since he is overwhelmed with the Moonstone, Mr. Franklin Blake goes to the Rachel’s room then takes it in order to put it in a safe place.
Readers will find this out as the novel progresses toward its finale. One by one all riddles are put to the surface but first of all readers must dwell so long upon clues, opinions, ideas that come up throughout the book. Thanks to Wilkie Collins’ sophisticated writing technique, the story moves fast that barely leaves readers get bored.
In an attempt to reveal all riddles, such as the smear of the nightgown hidden by Rosanna Spearman, Mr. Franklin Blake has to come back to where the late hides the box carrying the gown. Also, Mr. Franklin Blake has to meet Rachel and Sergeant Cuff to gather their statements. Plus, the gentleman has to invite Mr. Candy who falls so ill because of the fever and fatigue he suffers after the birthday event.
It is quite surprising that Ezra Jennings, much like Rosanna Spearman, emerges when the book starts getting complicated. The figure that I think will play a minor role turns out to the savior for Mr. Franklin Blake and Rachel. This is because Ezra Jennings initiates to put laudanum into the body of Mr. Franklin Blake, orders things as the way they were one year ago, invites Mr. Bruff as a witness then starts the experiment.
From his crazy idea it turns out that Mr. Franklin Blake does what he exactly does when the gemstone goes missing. While the characters are busy solving the riddles, the Moonstone for about one year is on the bank in London under the hands of Mr. Septimus Luker. During that time three Hindoos hunt it down. They are finally able to get it back then they give it to the caretaker of the gemstone in the shrine of a sacred city called Kattiawar in India.
I am myself so drown with the idea of starting things from the very beginning to solve problems in Mr. Franklin Blake’s life and the people concerning the Moonstone. Taking this story into my personal opinions, the idea of tracing things from the very roots are very challenging yet so worthy of trying to do in one’s life. Doing this requires bravery as Mr. Franklin Blake does. Sometimes, doing this will be fruitful or will not be.
While getting back to where the problems come may face us with painful memories, failures and nostalgia, our hearts are purified along the processes. All scars, heartbreaks will somehow be cleaned up while we battle to find solutions or answers. Much like walking on two sides of completely different views; one is full of tears or mess, the other one starts providing us with crystal clear outcomes. This is one of the wars one so worthy of trying.
And Mr. Franklin Blake succeeds in doing that. Not only the mess concerning the Moonstone is over, he and Rachel eventually gets married. I love Collins’ idea of bringing things back to start something new and fresh, as what happens to Mr. Franklin Blake. We can associate his experiences with our lives in whatever problems or trauma we encounter.